Blood Pressure Articles A-Z

Lisinopril - Lotensin and Depression

This page contains links to eMedTV Blood Pressure Articles containing information on subjects from Lisinopril to Lotensin and Depression. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Lisinopril
    Lisinopril is an ACE inhibitor approved to treat congestive heart failure and high blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works, other uses for it, possible side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil)
    The prescription drug lisinopril (Zestril, Prinivil) is approved for high blood pressure and other uses. This eMedTV segment takes a quick look at the other uses of this drug and explains how it is taken. Also included is a link to more details.
  • Lisinopril 10 mg Tablets
    If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may prescribe a daily dose of 10 mg lisinopril tablets. This eMedTV resource outlines other lisinopril dosing guidelines for other heart and blood vessel conditions and offers tips on using this medication.
  • Lisinopril 2.5 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, your doctor may prescribe 2.5 mg lisinopril tablets to treat certain heart and blood vessel conditions. This page also covers general lisinopril dosing guidelines and describes factors that may affect your dose.
  • Lisinopril 20 mg Tablets
    If you have high blood pressure, the normal daily dose of lisinopril tablets is 20 mg once daily. This eMedTV page discusses how lisinopril may help treat high blood pressure and other conditions, and lists tips on how to use this medicine.
  • Lisinopril 30 mg Tablets
    A doctor may prescribe 30 mg lisinopril tablets to treat several heart or blood vessel conditions. This eMedTV Web segment further discusses general lisinopril dosing guidelines and describes the factors that may affect your dosage.
  • Lisinopril 40 mg Tablets
    If you have high blood pressure, you may be prescribed 40 mg lisinopril tablets once daily. This eMedTV page offers more lisinopril dosing guidelines and explains the factors that may affect your dosage, such as your age and medications you are taking.
  • Lisinopril 5 mg Tablets
    If you have certain heart or blood vessel conditions, your doctor may prescribe 5 mg lisinopril tablets. This eMedTV segment offers some general lisinopril dosing guidelines if you have had a heart attack or to treat congestive heart failure.
  • Lisinopril Alternatives
    If you have side effects or if lisinopril is not working for you, there are several alternatives available. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of several alternatives to lisinopril, such as other blood pressure medications.
  • Lisinopril and Angioedema
    As with other ACE inhibitors, lisinopril can cause angioedema (swelling). This eMedTV Web segment further discusses angioedema and lisinopril, including the possible signs of angioedema that require immediate medical attention.
  • Lisinopril and Dry Eyes
    This eMedTV article explores the link between lisinopril and dry eyes. While there doesn't appear to be a connection, there are things you can do if this becomes a problem (such as avoiding artificial tears that irritate your eyes).
  • Lisinopril and Hair Loss
    Side effects may occur with the use of lisinopril, and hair loss is reported rarely. As this eMedTV page explains, because hair loss occurs so infrequently in people on lisinopril, it's hard to say whether it's caused by the drug or by other factors.
  • Lisinopril and Impotence
    There are several possible side effects of lisinopril, and erectile dysfunction is one of them. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at impotence and lisinopril, and provides information on how often sexual side effects occur with this medication.
  • Lisinopril and Liver Failure
    In rare cases, liver failure can be caused by lisinopril. This selection from the eMedTV archives further discusses this topic, including the possible signs of liver failure to watch out for and when you should contact your healthcare provider.
  • Lisinopril and Potassium
    Combining potassium and lisinopril could lead to dangerously high levels of potassium in your blood. This eMedTV article further discusses the potential dangers of taking this drug with a potassium product, and explains what your doctor may recommend.
  • Lisinopril and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page discusses a recent study on lisinopril and pregnancy, which discovered that the drug may pose more risk to fetuses or newborns than was previously thought. How the FDA rates the safety of drugs during pregnancy is also explained.
  • Lisinopril and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV segment discusses the link between lisinopril and weight gain and also explains why it is hard to determine if it is an actual side effect. The dangers of rapid weight gain and tips for combating gradual weight gain are included as well.
  • Lisinopril Blood Pressure Medicine
    As a type of blood pressure medicine, lisinopril works by relaxing the blood vessels. This page of the eMedTV Web site further discusses lisinopril, including how the medication works and information on the effectiveness of this medication.
  • Lisinopril Cough
    Some people taking lisinopril may experience a dry cough that doesn't go away. But as this eMedTV Web page explains, there's no way to know if and when a lisinopril cough will occur. This page describes how common this cough is and what causes it.
  • Lisinopril Dangers
    You may not be able to safely use lisinopril if you have certain medical conditions (such as diabetes). This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at other potential dangers of lisinopril to be aware of before starting treatment with this medication.
  • Lisinopril Dosage
    This eMedTV article describes lisinopril dosage guidelines for people with congestive heart failure (5 mg a day) and high blood pressure (10 mg a day). The dose following a heart attack and tips for taking the drug are also provided.
  • Lisinopril Drug Interactions
    NSAIDs and lithium are among the drugs that can potentially interact with lisinopril. This eMedTV Web page explains how these reactions with lisinopril can change how the body metabolizes the drugs and alter the levels of some medications in the blood.
  • Lisinopril for Children
    As this eMedTV segment explains, lisinopril is approved to treat certain heart and blood vessel conditions in adults and children. Lisinopril is safe to use in children (age six and older) who have high blood pressure.
  • Lisinopril for Congestive Heart Failure
    This eMedTV page explains that when congestive heart failure is treated with lisinopril, the medication works by relaxing the blood vessels and improving the efficiency of the heart. This page also offers a link to more detailed information on the drug.
  • Lisinopril Medication
    A prescription medication, lisinopril is used in the treatment of several heart and blood vessel conditions. This eMedTV resource covers its use for high blood pressure, CHF, and more and lists some basic dosing guidelines to keep in mind.
  • Lisinopril Medication Information
    This eMedTV page offers information on lisinopril, a medication used for treating several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This page also explains why lisinopril may not be suitable for some people and lists possible side effects.
  • Lisinopril Medicine
    As this eMedTV page explains, lisinopril is a medicine used to treat hypertension and heart failure, among other conditions. This article covers the drug's uses and how it works, and also offers links to articles on the different brands of lisinopril.
  • Lisinopril Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oral lisinopril tablets may be prescribed to treat several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This page also describes how lisinopril works, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Lisinopril Overdose
    If you take too much lisinopril, seek medical attention immediately. This eMedTV Web page lists symptoms of a lisinopril overdose (such as kidney failure and extremely low blood pressure) and treatment options (such as fluids through an IV).
  • Lisinopril Problems
    Some of the potential problems with lisinopril may include headaches, impotence, and diarrhea. This eMedTV page covers other problems you may have with this drug, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Lisinopril Risks
    Some of the potential risks with using lisinopril may include headaches, diarrhea, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web resource describes other risks of this drug, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Lisinopril Sexual Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article explains, a decreased sex drive and erectile dysfunction are reported only rarely with lisinopril. However, you should talk to your healthcare provider if, during treatment with lisinopril, sexual side effects become a problem.
  • Lisinopril Side Affects
    This eMedTV page lists common side effects of lisinopril (like vomiting and diarrhea) and side effects to report to your doctor right away (such as itching). Lisinopril side affects is a common misspelling and variation of side effects of lisinopril.
  • Lisinopril Strengths
    Lisinopril is available in the form of a tablet and comes in six strengths. This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides a list of the available strengths of lisinopril and discusses the factors that may affect your dosage of the medication.
  • Lisinopril Tablets
    Available as a tablet, lisinopril is a drug used to treat several heart or blood vessel conditions. This eMedTV page offers more detail on lisinopril, including how the medication works, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Lisinopril Warnings and Precautions
    Diabetes and scleroderma are among the conditions to tell your doctor about before taking lisinopril. This eMedTV page lists other lisinopril warnings and precautions, such as the risk of liver failure or a cough in some people taking the drug.
  • Lisinpril
    Lisinopril is a drug licensed to treat several heart and blood vessel conditions. This eMedTV page discusses how lisinopril works and explains what to tell your doctor before starting the drug. Lisinpril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisonipril
    This eMedTV page describes lisinopril, a drug used to treat several heart and blood vessel conditions. This article discusses how lisinopril works, dosing tips, and what to do if you overdose. Lisonipril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisonopril
    Lisinopril is a prescription medicine approved to treat several heart and blood vessel conditions. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of precautions and possible side effects of lisinopril. Lisonopril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Living With High Blood Pressure
    Are you living with high blood pressure? As this eMedTV resource explains, you are not alone. This article provides helpful tips on how you can lower your blood pressure and includes a link to more information on this topic.
  • Lonatin
    When treating severe high blood pressure, Loniten works by relaxing the blood vessels to improve blood flow. This eMedTV page further explains how this drug lowers blood pressure and lists side effects. Lonatin is a common misspelling of Loniten.
  • Loniten
    Available by prescription, Loniten is a drug used to lower high blood pressure. This eMedTV Web article offers an overview of this medicine, describing how it works, when and how to take it, and why it may not be the best choice for some people.
  • Loniten and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Loniten (minoxidil oral) advises that women not take this drug while nursing. This eMedTV Web page further discusses the possible risks of using Loniten while breastfeeding, including whether this drug passes through breast milk.
  • Loniten and Hair Growth
    Although Loniten and Rogaine contain the same active ingredient, do not use Loniten for hair growth. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses the potential risks of using Loniten to promote hair growth and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Loniten and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, Loniten (minoxidil oral) is a pregnancy Category C drug, which means that it may not be safe for pregnant women. This article describes what happened when this medication was given to pregnant animals.
  • Loniten Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, the starting Loniten dose for people older than 12 years of age is 5 mg once daily. This article takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for Loniten, including tips on how to safely take this drug.
  • Loniten Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV article explains, Loniten drug interactions can lower your blood pressure too much or cause other negative reactions. These interactions can occur when Loniten is combined with yohimbe, rituximab, or several other medications.
  • Loniten Medication Information
    Loniten is commonly prescribed to treat severe high blood pressure in adults, children, and infants. This eMedTV Web selection provides important information on Loniten, including how to take this medication and possible side effects.
  • Loniten Overdose
    Headaches, dizziness, and fast heart rate are possible signs of an overdose with Loniten (minoxidil oral). This eMedTV page lists other symptoms a person might experience after taking too much of this drug, as well as available treatment options.
  • Loniten Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource explains that headaches, dizziness, and vomiting are common Loniten side effects. This page lists other common reactions reported with this medicine, as well as potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Loniten Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Loniten is used for treating high blood pressure. This page discusses why Loniten is only prescribed when blood pressure is damaging vital organs. A description of how this drug works and off-label uses are also included.
  • Loniten Warnings and Precautions
    If you have had a heart attack, let your doctor know before you take Loniten. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at what your doctor needs to know and describes important precautions and warnings with Loniten to be aware of before beginning treatment.
  • Lopresor
    Lopressor is used to treat high blood pressure and angina, among other conditions. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works and discusses its effects, possible side effects, and dosing information. Lopresor is a common misspelling of Lopressor.
  • Lopresser
    Lopressor is drug that is prescribed to treat several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV page gives an overview of Lopressor and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Lopresser is a common misspelling of Lopressor.
  • Lopressor
    Lopressor is a drug used to treat several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV page covers some specific uses of the prescription drug (such as relieving angina symptoms), as well as its effects, dosing tips, and strengths.
  • Lopressor and Pregnancy
    This page on the eMedTV site explains that there may be an increased risk to the fetus if Lopressor is used during pregnancy, but the exact risk is unknown. If you become pregnant while taking this drug, you should let your doctor know right away.
  • Lopressor Dosage
    For high blood pressure control, the starting Lopressor dosage is 100 mg once daily or 50 mg twice daily. This eMedTV Web page also lists the dose for relieving angina symptoms and covers dosing guidelines following a heart attack.
  • Lopressor Interactions
    This eMedTV resource provides a list of medicines that may interact negatively with Lopressor, including fluoxetine, terbinafine, and NSAIDs. Drug interactions with Lopressor can change how your body metabolizes the drugs, among other things.
  • Lopressor Overdose
    People who overdose on Lopressor may experience tiredness, a decrease in breathing, or even death. This eMedTV article lists other possible symptoms of an overdose, as well as treatment options used to relieve symptoms (such as pumping the stomach).
  • Lopressor Precautions and Warnings
    You should not take Lopressor if you have sick sinus syndrome. This eMedTV article offers other Lopressor precautions and warnings, including more information on who should not take the drug and possible side effects to look out for.
  • Lopressor Side Effects
    Some common side effects of Lopressor include itching, dizziness, and a slow heart rate. This page of the eMedTV site also offers a list of serious side effects that require medical attention, as well as rare side effects that may be related to the drug.
  • Lopressor Uses
    Lopressor is licensed to treat high blood pressure and angina and to improve survival after a heart attack. This eMedTV page also lists off-label uses for Lopressor, such as the treatment of anxiety or arrhythmias and treating Marfan syndrome in children.
  • Lotensin
    Available by prescription, Lotensin is a drug used to lower high blood pressure. This eMedTV article gives an overview of Lotensin, describing how it works, how and when to take it, and what to do if you overdose.
  • Lotensin and Depression
    While depression does not appear to be a Lotensin side effect, this eMedTV page advises talking with your doctor if you're taking Lotensin and depression does occur. This page lists depression symptoms like a persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" mood.
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