Blood Pressure Articles A-Z

Isradipine Oral Capsules - Liquid Lasix

This page contains links to eMedTV Blood Pressure Articles containing information on subjects from Isradipine Oral Capsules to Liquid Lasix. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Isradipine Oral Capsules
    Available in the form of oral capsules, isradipine is approved for the treatment of high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment gives some basic information on the medication, including details on how it works. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Kalan
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Calan to treat angina, high blood pressure, and arrhythmias. This eMedTV article explores some potential side effects of Calan and offers general dosing information. Kalan is a common misspelling of Calan.
  • Kalen
    This eMedTV article explains that Calan works to treat high blood pressure, chest pain, and irregular heart rhythms. This page also describes dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and overdose symptoms. Kalen is a common misspelling of Calan.
  • Kalin
    Calan, a drug used to treat angina, high blood pressure, and arrhythmias, works by relaxing blood vessels. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this medication, including dosing tips and possible side effects. Kalin is a common misspelling of Calan.
  • Labetalol
    Labetalol is a prescription medication that can be used to control high blood pressure. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this drug, including tips on how to best take it, common side effects to be aware of, dosing information, and more.
  • Labetalol and Breastfeeding
    Labetalol could cause problems in a nursing infant. This selection from the eMedTV archives takes a closer look at breastfeeding and labetalol, including information on the side effects that may occur in a nursing child exposed to the drug.
  • Labetalol and Dry Eyes
    Less than 1 percent of people reported experiencing dry eyes with labetalol. As this eMedTV resource explains, because this potential problem is so uncommon, it's often difficult to tell if dry eyes is actually a side effect of the drug.
  • Labetalol and Hair Loss
    Many side effects are associated with labetalol, and hair loss is one of them. As explained in this eMedTV article, hair loss is a side effect that occurred in less than 1 percent of people taking this medication in clinical trials.
  • Labetalol and Pregnancy
    The use of labetalol during pregnancy may increase the risk for health problems in a fetus. This article on the eMedTV Web site discusses this issue in detail, including information on the results of studies involving pregnant animals.
  • Labetalol and Weight Gain
    Gradual weight gain does not appear to be a side effect of labetalol. This eMedTV resource discusses labetalol and weight gain, and explains that a rapid increase in weight while on the drug may be a sign of a serious medical condition.
  • Labetalol Dosing
    For people just starting labetalol, dosing typically begins at 100 mg twice daily. This section of the eMedTV library discusses the typical dosage used to maintain a normal blood pressure and discusses how to best take the medication.
  • Labetalol HCl
    Labetalol hydrochloride (HCl) is a blood pressure medication that is usually taken two or three times daily. This eMedTV article offers more details on this drug, including some of the potential side effects. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Labetalol Overdose
    Symptoms associated with an overdose of labetalol may include trouble breathing, seizures, and fainting. This eMedTV resource lists other possible symptoms and describes how such an overdose is typically treated.
  • Labetalol Sexual Side Effects
    In the case of labetalol, sexual side effects of the drug may include impotence and Peyronie's disease. This eMedTV segment discusses these and other sexual problems, and explains what your doctor can do if they occur while taking labetalol.
  • Labetalol Side Effects
    Common side effects of labetalol may include fatigue, nasal stuffiness, or nausea. This part of the eMedTV Web site also lists less common problems and serious side effects that require medical attention, such as confusion or vomiting.
  • Labetelol
    This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how labetalol works to treat high blood pressure in adults. This Web page also describes the factors that may affect your labetalol dosage. Labetelol is a common misspelling of labetalol.
  • Labetolol
    Labetalol is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat high blood pressure in adults. This page on the eMedTV Web site discusses labetalol and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Labetolol is a common misspelling of labetalol.
  • Labetolol Side Effects
    This eMedTV page lists potential labetalol side effects, such as fatigue, nausea, or dry eyes. Rare side effects, as well as problems that should be reported, are also listed. Labetolol side effects is a common misspelling of labetalol side effects.
  • Lasex
    Lasix is a medication that is used to treat high blood pressure and fluid retention. This eMedTV resource provides an overview of the drug, including some possible symptoms of an overdose. Lasex is a common misspelling of Lasix.
  • Lasics
    Lasix is a prescription drug that is used to treat high blood pressure and fluid retention. This eMedTV segment explains how Lasix works and describes the factors that will determine your dosage. Lasics is a common misspelling of Lasix.
  • Lasix
    Lasix is a prescription medicine that is used to treat fluid retention and high blood pressure. This eMedTV article explains how Lasix works to decrease blood volume, offers tips for when and how to take the drug, and lists potential side effects.
  • Lasix (Furosemide) Medication Information
    Lasix is often prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure and water retention. This eMedTV article contains more information about the prescription medication Lasix (furosemide), including details on how it works and how often it is taken.
  • Lasix 20 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available for Lasix, 20 mg tablets are the lowest strength. This page from the eMedTV site offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of high blood pressure and water retention, and explains how dosing for Lasix works in children.
  • Lasix 40 mg Tablets
    Adults being treated for high blood pressure typically start with Lasix 40 mg tablets. This article on the eMedTV Web site explains how often this drug is taken per day and provides Lasix dosing guidelines for the treatment of water retention.
  • Lasix 80 mg Tablets
    There are three different strengths available for Lasix tablets; 80 mg is the highest one available. This eMedTV segment provides dosing recommendations when using Lasix for the treatment of high blood pressure and water retention.
  • Lasix Alternatives
    Lasix alternatives for blood pressure control include lifestyle changes or other medications. This eMedTV resource also discusses Lasix alternatives for treating water retention, such as taking other diuretics or limiting your salt intake.
  • Lasix and Breastfeeding
    While Lasix does pass through breast milk, it still may be safe for you to breastfeed while on this drug. This eMedTV page explains the research that has been conducted on Lasix and breastfeeding, and describes what to watch for in your nursing baby.
  • Lasix and Constipation
    You should know that if you are taking Lasix, constipation is a possible side effect. As this eMedTV Web article explains, Lasix has been studied thoroughly in clinical trials, and constipation was reported as one of the common adverse reactions.
  • Lasix and Hearing Loss
    Several side effects can occur with Lasix, and hearing loss has been reported. As this eMedTV page explains, this drug can cause various hearing problems, including tinnitus, and describes situations in which this reaction may be more likely to occur.
  • Lasix and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to take Lasix during pregnancy, as the drug could cause harm to the unborn child. This eMedTV Web page explains the results of animal studies involving Lasix and pregnancy, where the drug caused death of both mother and baby.
  • Lasix Blood Pressure Medicine
    The blood pressure medicine Lasix is also approved for the treatment of water retention. This Web page on the eMedTV site describes how this medication works, explains how often it is typically taken, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Lasix Dangers
    As this eMedTV article explains, although most people do not experience any problems while taking Lasix, dangers associated with the drug should be reviewed before treatment begins. This page lists some of the side effects that may occur with Lasix.
  • Lasix Diuretic Information
    This page of the eMedTV Web site offers important information on Lasix, a diuretic used for treating high blood pressure and fluid retention. This page also discusses why this drug is not suitable for everyone and offers general dosing guidelines.
  • Lasix Dosage
    The recommended starting dose of Lasix for high blood pressure is 40 mg twice daily. This eMedTV resource also outlines the dosage recommendations for treating fluid retention and discusses dosing guidelines for children and infants.
  • Lasix Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site offers important information on Lasix, a drug used to treat fluid retention and high blood pressure. This page also explains why this medication is not suitable for everyone and offers general dosing guidelines.
  • Lasix Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page lists medicines that can potentially cause Lasix drug interactions, such as hydrocortisone, lithium, or NSAIDs. These interactions can cause low potassium levels or increase your risk of permanent hearing loss, among other things.
  • Lasix for Children
    Lasix is approved for treating fluid retention in infants and children. Lasix, as this eMedTV page explains, works by increasing the amount of salt and water removed from the blood. This page also offers dosing guidelines when giving children this drug.
  • Lasix for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)
    This eMedTV article explains that if you have congestive heart failure, Lasix can help treat symptoms of fluid retention. This page discusses how this medication works and how it can help treat conditions such as CHF that cause the body to retain fluid.
  • Lasix for High Blood Pressure
    This segment from the eMedTV Web site offers a brief look at controlling high blood pressure with Lasix. This article explains how the drug works to decrease hypertension and discusses the results of clinical studies done on Lasix.
  • Lasix Indications
    As this eMedTV page explains, Lasix is often prescribed to treat high blood pressure and fluid retention. This page takes a closer look at these and other Lasix indications, including information on its use in children and possible off-label uses.
  • Lasix Oral
    Lasix is an oral medication commonly used for treating water retention and high blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page describes the specific effects of this medicine and offers general information on when and how to take it, with a link to learn more.
  • Lasix OTC
    There is no Lasix OTC (over-the-counter) available, as this drug can only be obtained with a prescription. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of Lasix, including information on what it is used to treat, how it works, and general precautions.
  • Lasix Overdose
    Lasix overdose symptoms may include weakness, dizziness, or vomiting. This portion of the eMedTV library offers a more detailed list of other possible overdose symptoms, overdose effects, and some of the treatment options that are available.
  • Lasix Pills
    Part of a class of drugs called diuretics ("water pills"), Lasix is often used to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV page covers other approved uses, explains how often the drug is usually taken, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Lasix Problems
    It is possible to develop certain problems with Lasix, although most people tolerate the medication well. This eMedTV page lists some of the side effects seen with this drug and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before taking Lasix.
  • Lasix Risks
    Lasix may cause extremely low blood pressure in some people. This article from the eMedTV site discusses other potential risks of Lasix use and includes a list of potentially serious side effects of the drug that require immediate medical attention.
  • Lasix Side Effects
    This portion of the eMedTV archives contains a list of potential side effects of Lasix, such as diarrhea, vertigo, and sensitivity to the sun. This resource also outlines some of the more serious side effects that require immediate attention.
  • Lasix Strengths
    There are several different forms and strengths of Lasix. As this section of the eMedTV Web site explains, Lasix tablets are available in three strengths, a liquid version is available in two, and an injectable form is also used in hospitals.
  • Lasix Substitute
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides a list of various alternatives to Lasix, including lifestyle changes and other medications. This article also explains when a healthcare provider may recommend a substitute for Lasix.
  • Lasix Tablets
    The tablet form of Lasix is usually taken once or twice a day, depending on the severity of your condition. This eMedTV segment lists the various strengths of this drug and briefly explains when and how to take this prescription diuretic.
  • Lasix Uses
    Lasix is approved to treat high blood pressure and water retention. This portion of the eMedTV library describes these uses of Lasix in more detail, explains how Lasix works, and discusses possible off-label uses of the medicine.
  • Lasix Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article offers several Lasix warnings and precautions, such as those relating to the risk of high blood sugar, the possibility of hearing loss, and possible pregnancy risks. This page also explains who should not take the drug.
  • Lasix Water Pill
    This eMedTV page explains that as a type of diuretic or "water pill," Lasix works to treat high blood pressure or fluid retention by increasing the amount of salt and water removed from the blood. This page also describes some general precautions.
  • Lasix Without a Prescription
    Lasix is not available without a prescription. Lasix, as this eMedTV page explains, is approved for treating high blood pressure and fluid retention. This page also covers why this drug is not suitable for everyone and offers general dosing guidelines.
  • Lebetalol
    This eMedTV article features a brief overview of labetalol, a prescription drug used to treat high blood pressure. This page lists possible side effects and explains what to do before starting the drug. Lebetalol is a common misspelling of labetalol.
  • Levatol
    Levatol is a beta blocker medication often prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment explains how the medicine works, offers dosing information, lists some of the potential side effects to be aware of, and more.
  • Levatol and Breastfeeding
    No studies have been done to see if Levatol (penbutolol) passes through breast milk. This page from the eMedTV library offers more information on breastfeeding and Levatol, and describes the problems that may occur if an infant is exposed to the drug.
  • Levatol and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Levatol (penbutolol) during pregnancy are not known at this time. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on this topic and explains what problems occurred when the medication was used in animal studies.
  • Levatol Dosage
    When treating high blood pressure, the usual prescribed amount of Levatol is 20 mg once daily. This eMedTV resource provides more information on dosing with Levatol and includes warnings on how to stop taking this medication safely.
  • Levatol Drug Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, Levatol is approved for the treatment of high blood pressure. This resource takes a quick look at this prescription drug and lists some safety warnings to keep in mind. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Levatol Interactions
    Certain medicines may cause drug interactions with Levatol, including digoxin, clonidine, and NSAIDs. As this eMedTV page explains, these interactions could lead to dangerously low blood pressure, extremely slow heart rate, and other problems.
  • Levatol Overdose
    People who take too much Levatol may experience constriction of the airway, low blood sugar, or a coma. This eMedTV resource provides a more complete list of possible effects of a Levatol overdose and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Levatol Side Effects
    Common side effects of Levatol may include indigestion or heartburn, headache, and insomnia. This eMedTV Web page lists other common problems and describes potentially serious reactions that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Levatol Uses
    High blood pressure is commonly treated with Levatol. This page from the eMedTV site discusses these uses for Levatol in more detail (including possible off-label uses), describes how the drug works, and explains whether it is suitable for children.
  • Levatol Warnings and Precautions
    If you have diabetes, tell your doctor before taking Levatol. This eMedTV page lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before beginning treatment. Warnings and precautions with Levatol, including who should avoid it, are also included.
  • Licinopril
    A doctor may prescribe lisinopril to help treat several conditions of the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV article lists possible side effects of lisinopril and discusses some general precautions. Licinopril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Licinopril Side Effects
    Some common side effects of lisinopril include diarrhea and dizziness. This eMedTV page also covers which side effects may require immediate medical care. Licinopril side effects is a common misspelling and variation of side effects of lisinopril.
  • Lifestyle Changes for Controlling High Blood Pressure
    Lifestyle changes are the first form of treatment for high blood pressure. This video clip explain lifestyle choices
  • Liquid Lasix
    The liquid form of Lasix comes in two different strengths and is only available as a generic. This eMedTV Web page discusses the approved uses of Lasix and lists the various strengths available for the liquid version of this medicine.
  • Lisenopril
    This eMedTV page briefly describes lisinopril, a drug used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This page covers how the drug works and common side effects. Lisenopril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisinapril
    As this eMedTV page explains, lisinopril is prescribed to treat several heart and blood vessel conditions. This page discusses how lisinopril works and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Lisinapril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisinepril
    Lisinopril is used to treat heart failure and other conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of the drug, including how and when to take it. Lisinepril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisinipril
    This eMedTV Web page explores lisinopril, a drug used to treat conditions related to the heart and blood vessels (such as congestive heart failure). The drug's effects and dosing are briefly explored. Lisinipril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisinipril Side Effects
    Common side effects of lisinopril, as this segment of the eMedTV archives explains, include fatigue and nausea. A link to more detailed information is also provided. Lisinipril side effects is a common misspelling of side effects of lisinopril.
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