Blood Pressure Articles A-Z

Atenolol and Depression - Avapro and Weight Gain

This page contains links to eMedTV Blood Pressure Articles containing information on subjects from Atenolol and Depression to Avapro and Weight Gain. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Atenolol and Depression
    It isn't known whether atenolol and depression are linked. This eMedTV segment lists possible depression symptoms to look out for while taking atenolol -- including restlessness and irritability, as well as feelings of hopelessness and pessimism.
  • Atenolol and Dry Eyes
    Dry eyes aren't a reported side effect of atenolol. But as this eMedTV page explains, if you're taking atenolol and dry eyes do occur, there are some things you can do, such as blinking several times a minute while reading or working on the computer.
  • Atenolol and Hair Loss
    In rare cases, people may develop hair loss as a side effect while taking atenolol. This eMedTV page discusses the likelihood of developing this side effect and notes that in many cases, this hair loss appears to be reversible.
  • Atenolol and Impotence
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is not known whether there's a relationship between atenolol and impotence (a problem reported occasionally in people taking the drug). If you do develop impotence while on atenolol, contact your healthcare provider.
  • Atenolol and Low Blood Sugar
    This eMedTV article urges contacting your healthcare provider immediately if you're taking atenolol and low blood sugar symptoms occur. This page also lists some possible symptoms of low blood sugar, including extreme hunger, shakiness, and sweating.
  • Atenolol and Weight Gain
    If you're on atenolol and weight gain occurs, you can help it with diet and exercise, among other things. This eMedTV page explains that rapid weight gain along with swelling can signify heart failure in some people taking this drug.
  • Atenolol Blood Pressure Medicine
    As this eMedTV page explains, atenolol is a prescription drug used to treat several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. Most people use it as a blood pressure medicine, but atenolol is also licensed to treat angina symptoms.
  • Atenolol Dangers
    Atenolol can cause low blood pressure and various other side effects. This article from the eMedTV Web site explores other possible dangers of atenolol, including information on who should not use this drug and what other side effects may occur.
  • Atenolol Dose
    The starting dose of atenolol for people with high blood pressure or angina is 50 mg once daily. This eMedTV article also covers dosing after a heart attack and factors that can affect the amount you are prescribed (like other drugs you may be taking).
  • Atenolol Drug Information
    Atenolol is a beta blocker medication often used for the treatment of high blood pressure or angina. This eMedTV segment provides more information on the drug, including details on how atenolol works and a list of some potential side effects.
  • Atenolol for Anxiety
    Treating anxiety with atenolol is considered to be an "off-label" use of the medication. This page on the eMedTV site provides a list of other off-label atenolol uses and offers information about the approved uses for this medication.
  • Atenolol for Chest Pain
    Atenolol is often prescribed for conditions such as high blood pressure and chest pain. This article found on the eMedTV Web site talks about treating angina-related chest pain with atenolol and describes the specific effects of the medication.
  • Atenolol for Children
    As this eMedTV article explains, atenolol is not approved for use in children. This eMedTV Web page discusses approved atenolol uses in more detail and explains how the medicine is sometimes used "off-label" for children.
  • Atenolol in Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page lists complications seen in some fetuses or newborns exposed to atenolol in pregnancy (such as small birth weight) and explains that the drug may be given to a pregnant woman if its benefits outweigh the possible risks to her fetus.
  • Atenolol Medication
    This page of the eMedTV site takes a look at atenolol, a medication used to treat several conditions affecting the heart and blood vessels. It lists some of the uses for this drug and addresses the possibility of side effects, with a link to learn more.
  • Atenolol Medication Information
    Atenolol is a prescription beta blocker medicine used for treating high blood pressure and angina symptoms. This eMedTV article offers more information on the medication, including details on how atenolol works, general warnings, precautions, and more.
  • Atenolol Oral
    Atenolol is a medication often prescribed to treat high blood pressure and chest pain caused by angina. This eMedTV segment lists other uses for this drug, explains when and how to take oral atenolol tablets, and describes how the medicine works.
  • Atenolol Overdose
    Wheezing and tiredness are among the symptoms of an atenolol overdose. This eMedTV page lists factors that can affect the symptoms of an overdose (such as how much medicine is taken) and some treatment options (like supportive care).
  • Atenolol Pills
    Atenolol is a prescription drug often used for treating high blood pressure and angina symptoms. This eMedTV page discusses the use of this medicine in more detail, briefly covers when and how to take the pills, and explains how atenolol works.
  • Atenolol Problems
    Atenolol may cause side effects such as fatigue, shortness of breath, or chest pain. This eMedTV resource explains what other side effects or problems may occur with atenolol and offers information on who should not use this medication.
  • Atenolol Risks
    Taking atenolol during pregnancy could cause problems in the unborn child. This eMedTV page discusses other potential risks with atenolol, including other side effects or problems that may occur with the drug and information on who should not use it.
  • Atenolol Side Effects
    Among the atenolol side effects explored in this eMedTV article are common side effects like tiredness and dizziness; rare side effects like headache and dry eyes; and side effects to report to your doctor right away, such as chest pain and confusion.
  • Atenolol Strengths
    There are three different strengths of atenolol, including 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg tablets. This page from the eMedTV library describes atenolol in more detail, explains what this medicine is used for, and describes how it works.
  • Atenolol Tablets
    Atenolol is a prescription drug approved to treat high blood pressure and symptoms of angina. This page on the eMedTV Web page briefly explains when and how to take the tablets and offers information on how atenolol works.
  • Atican
    Atacand is a prescription medicine licensed to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV resource explains how Atacand works and describes what to do in case of an overdose. Atican is a common misspelling of Atacand.
  • Attenolol
    This eMedTV page explains that atenolol is often prescribed for high blood pressure, angina, and after a heart attack. This page also discusses what to tell your doctor before starting this medicine. Attenolol is a common misspelling of atenolol.
  • Avalid
    Avalide is a medication licensed to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV page features a brief overview of Avalide, including details on how the drug works, dosing information, and possible side effects. Avalid is a common misspelling of Avalide.
  • Avalide
    Avalide is a drug prescribed to treat high blood pressure. This page on the eMedTV Web site gives an overview of this combination medicine, including an explanation of how it works, its potential side effects, when and how to take it, and more.
  • Avalide 12.5/150
    This eMedTV article explains that if you have high blood pressure, a doctor may prescribe Avalide. This page also offers some tips on taking this drug and lists the various strengths available, the lowest of which is Avalide 150/12.5 mg.
  • Avalide 300/25 Mg
    When treating high blood pressure, the maximum dosage of Avalide is 300/25 mg daily. This eMedTV page discusses the factors that may affect your dosage and describes what your healthcare provider may recommend as your starting dosage.
  • Avalide and Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV page explains, Avalide may increase blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This page discusses why this medication may not be suitable for people with diabetes and what your doctor may do to help control your blood sugar levels.
  • Avalide and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV article explains that although some experts believe it is safe to take Avalide (irbesartan/HCTZ) while breastfeeding, the manufacturer of the drug advises against it. This page discusses why this drug may not be safe to take while nursing.
  • Avalide and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains why taking Avalide (irbesartan/HCTZ) during pregnancy may cause potentially serious complications in a developing fetus. This page lists some specific problems this drug may cause, such as skull deformity and kidney problems.
  • Avalide Dosage
    Avalide comes in tablet form and is taken by mouth. This eMedTV article outlines the dosing guidelines for Avalide, with important tips on when and how to take this medication, and whether it should be taken with food.
  • Avalide Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions can occur if Avalide is taken with Advil, alcohol, prednisone, or certain other products. This Web resource describes other medications that can react with Avalide and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Avalide High Blood Pressure Medicine
    This eMedTV resource offers a brief look at the prescription drug Avalide. This article explains how Avalide works to treat high blood pressure, offers general dosing guidelines for the medicine, and talks about what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Avalide Medication Information
    This eMedTV segment provides some basic information on Avalide, a medication used to treat high blood pressure. This resource also explains how this prescription medicine works, dosing tips, and why it may not be the best choice for some people.
  • Avalide Overdose
    Symptoms of an Avalide (irbesartan/HCTZ) overdose can include nausea, confusion, and seizures. This eMedTV segment explains other effects an overdose can cause and also describes the treatment options that are available, including supportive care.
  • Avalide Side Affects
    Among the Avalide side effects listed in this eMedTV Web resource are common side effects like dizziness and tiredness, as well as side effects to report to your doctor. Avalide side affects is a common misspelling of Avalide side effects.
  • Avalide Side Effects
    Dizziness, tiredness, and nausea are among the possible side effects of Avalide. This eMedTV Web page lists additional side effects reported with the drug, as well as a few reactions that are potentially serious and may require medical attention.
  • Avalide Tablet
    A doctor may prescribe Avalide tablets to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV Web article offers more details on Avalide, including information on potential side effects, general safety precautions, and tips on taking the medication.
  • Avalide Uses
    Available by prescription, Avalide is used for controlling high blood pressure in adults. This eMedTV page describes how the drug works, and also offers an in-depth look at what high blood pressure is and what long-term complications it can cause.
  • Avalide Warnings and Precautions
    Avalide may increase your risk of gout, lupus, and diabetes. This eMedTV resource offers several warnings and precautions to be aware of before taking Avalide, including safety issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Avalyde
    Avalide is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment features a brief overview of Avalide, including how it works and some general safety precautions. Avalyde is a common misspelling of Avalide.
  • Avapro
    Avapro is often prescribed for people with diabetic nephropathy or high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment explains how the drug works and discusses possible side effects, available strengths, and general dosing information.
  • Avapro and Depression
    There are possible side effects of Avapro, and depression occurs in less than 1 percent of patients. This eMedTV resource contains a list of signs that may indicate depression, such as decreased energy and feelings of hopelessness or pessimism.
  • Avapro and Hair Loss
    If you are taking Avapro and hair loss occurs, your doctor may suggest a different medication. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, hair loss is not typically considered a common or rare side effect of Avapro.
  • Avapro and Pregnancy
    Certain complications may occur with the use of Avapro, and problems in pregnancy are a potential risk. This eMedTV page explains the link between Avapro and pregnancy, including problems seen in fetuses or newborns exposed to the drug.
  • Avapro and Weight Gain
    Side effects may develop with Avapro, and weight gain has not been reported as a side effect of the drug. This eMedTV page describes the studies in which side effects are documented and offers tips for helping with any gradual weight gain.
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