Blood Pressure Articles A-Z

Side Affects of Norvasc - Tarka Precautions and Warnings

This page contains links to eMedTV Blood Pressure Articles containing information on subjects from Side Affects of Norvasc to Tarka Precautions and Warnings. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Side Affects of Norvasc
    Dizziness, nausea, and swelling are a few of the side effects that can occur with Norvasc. This eMedTV page covers Norvasc side effects in greater detail. Side affects of Norvasc is a common misspelling and variation of Norvasc side effects.
  • Side Effects of Aliskiren-HCTZ
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, many side effects of aliskiren-HCTZ are minor and can include things like dizziness, diarrhea, and a cough. This page also describes some of the more serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Bisoprolol and Hydrochlorothiazide
    Nausea, drowsiness, and fatigue have been reported as bisoprolol and hydrochlorothiazide side effects. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Eprosartan/HCTZ
    Headaches, dizziness, and back pain are a few of the common eprosartan/HCTZ side effects. This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of common and potentially serious problems that can occur while taking this drug, with statistics on how often they occur.
  • Side Effects of Fosinopril
    The most common side effects of fosinopril can include a cough, dizziness, and nausea. This eMedTV page covers these side effects as well as some of the more severe and rare side effects of fosinopril, such as weight gain and a decreased sex drive.
  • Side Effects of Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV Web page contains a list of potential side effects of hydrochlorothiazide, such as dizziness, nausea, and constipation. Serious side effects (like an unexplained rash) that require immediate medical attention are also listed.
  • Side Effects of Isradipine
    Constipation, sweating, and dry mouth are some of the rare but possible side effects of isradipine. This eMedTV segment lists more common isradipine side effects and explains which ones are potentially serious and require immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Lisinopril
    While side effects of lisinopril often require no treatment, some are more serious. This eMedTV article lists common side effects seen with the drug, rare side effects, and side effects that you should report immediately to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Perindopril
    Sexual side effects, back pain, and indigestion are among the possible side effects of perindopril. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects seen with this medicine, including serious ones that require medical attention, such as fainting spells.
  • Side Effects of Propranolol XL
    Common side effects of propranolol XL include constipation, fatigue, and dizziness. This article from the eMedTV site lists other possible side effects, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Side Effects of Quinaretic
    Common side effects of Quinaretic include such things as fatigue, headache, and a cough. This eMedTV article discusses common and rare side effects of Quinaretic, along with details about serious health problems associated with the drug.
  • Side Effects of Toporol
    This eMedTV page lists some side effects of Toprol-XL -- including examples of common and rare side effects of the drug -- and provides a link to more detailed information. Side effects of Toporol is a common misspelling of side effects of Toprol-XL.
  • Side Effects of Toporol XL
    People taking Toprol-XL may experience a number of side effects, such as dizziness or tiredness. This eMedTV segment covers a few of the side effects of this drug. Side effects of Toporol XL is a common misspelling of side effects of Toprol-XL.
  • Side Effects of Toprol-XL
    Slow heart rate, tiredness, and dizziness are a few common side effects of Toprol-XL. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at many side effects seen with this drug, including those you should report to your healthcare provider.
  • Side Effects of Torsemide
    As with any medicine, there are potential side effects of torsemide, such as a runny nose and diarrhea. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at the common side effects of torsemide and describes which side effects need immediate medical attention.
  • Signs and Symptoms of High Blood Pressure
    Headache, dizziness, and nausea are possible signs and symptoms of high blood pressure. However, as this eMedTV page explains, most people with the condition do not experience any high blood pressure signs and symptoms until organ damage has occurred.
  • Sistolic Blood Pressure
    As this eMedTV page explains, systolic pressure measures the pressure in the blood vessels when your heart beats. This article also offers a link to more detailed information. Sistolic blood pressure is a common misspelling of systolic blood pressure.
  • Smoking and High Blood Pressure
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, smoking may not be a direct cause of hypertension, but it increases your risk of heart disease. This article offers more detailed information on high blood pressure and smoking, and provides tips for quitting.
  • Sphygmomanometer
    There are two types of sphygmomanometers (devices used to measure blood pressure). This portion of the eMedTV archives takes a closer look at how blood pressure is measured, and also explains how these devices work.
  • Stress and High Blood Pressure
    Studies on high blood pressure and stress, as this eMedTV Web page explains, show that long-term stress may affect blood pressure; however, the effects of short-term stress are limited. This requires a rethinking of popular myths about stress.
  • Sular
    Sular is a prescription medicine that is used for the treatment of high blood pressure. This page on the eMedTV site offers dosing information on Sular, describes the effects of the medication, and explains what you should know before taking the drug.
  • Sular and Breastfeeding
    No research has been conducted on whether Sular passes through breast milk. This eMedTV segment further discusses the link between Sular and breastfeeding, and explains why it is generally recommended that breastfeeding women avoid the drug.
  • Sular and Depression
    Depression is a rare but possible side effect of Sular. This section of the eMedTV Web site discusses the link between Sular and depression in more detail and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend if depression symptoms occur.
  • Sular and Dry Mouth
    It is possible to develop a dry mouth while taking Sular. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Sular and dry mouth, including a list of suggestions for dry mouth relief and an explanation of what your doctor may recommend as treatment.
  • Sular and Impotence
    In clinical trials, impotence was reported in less than 1 percent of men taking Sular. This page from the eMedTV library offers more information on Sular and impotence, and explains what you should do if you develop impotence as a side effect.
  • Sular and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Sular during pregnancy are not known. As this eMedTV page explains, studies on Sular and pregnancy show that the drug caused miscarriages and birth defects when it was given to animals, but the full risks to humans are unknown.
  • Sular Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended starting Sular dosage for the treatment of high blood pressure is 17 or 20 mg, depending on the formulation your doctor recommends. This resource provides other helpful dosing guidelines for this drug.
  • Sular Drug Interactions
    Medications that may cause Sular drug interactions include nefazodone, quinidine, and phenytoin. This eMedTV article contains a list of other drugs that may cause Sular interactions and explains what may happen when these medicines are taken together.
  • Sular for High Blood Pressure
    If you have high blood pressure (hypertension), your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called Sular. This eMedTV selection gives a brief description of this calcium channel blocker and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Sular Overdose
    As with most calcium channel blockers, an overdose of Sular may potentially cause low blood pressure. This eMedTV article lists common symptoms of a Sular overdose and explains what treatment options are currently available.
  • Sular Side Effects
    Some of the most common Sular side effects seen in studies include nausea, dizziness, and flushing. This eMedTV page lists rare but possible side effects of this drug, describes other common reactions, and explains which symptoms require treatment.
  • Sular Uses
    Sular is used for treating high blood pressure in adults. This article from the eMedTV archives explains how the medication works, discusses whether it is approved for use in children, and lists possible "off-label" Sular uses.
  • Sular Warnings and Precautions
    Sular may cause extremely low blood pressure. This eMedTV page lists other Sular warnings and precautions, and explains who should not take the drug. Potential side effects or complications associated with the medicine are also listed in this article.
  • Supplements for High Blood Pressure
    This eMedTV Web page explores the benefits of supplements for high blood pressure, like potassium. Research shows that potassium lowers blood pressure, but other commonly tried supplements are not proven to reduce hypertension.
  • Symptoms of High Blood Pressure
    In many cases, symptoms of high blood pressure don't exist until the disease affects organs. As this eMedTV page explains, high blood pressure symptoms, when present, include vision problems, nausea, and lightheadedness, among other things.
  • Symptoms of High Blood Presure
    This eMedTV page lists symptoms of both high blood pressure (such as dizziness and headache) and severe high blood pressure (such as lightheadedness and nausea). Symptoms of high blood presure is a common variation of symptoms of high blood pressure.
  • Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the top and bottom numbers of a blood pressure reading are the systolic and diastolic blood pressures, respectively. This article explains how these numbers are determined, what is normal, and what is high.
  • Systolic Blood Pressure
    As this eMedTV article explains, systolic blood pressure is the top number in a blood pressure reading. It represents the amount of pressure blood puts on vessels when the heart is beating. This page takes a look at this number and how it is measured.
  • Taking Blood Pressure
    This eMedTV page describes the process of taking blood pressure readings, including the devices used. When your blood pressure is being measured, it's important to get at least two readings -- taken at least two minutes apart -- and average the results.
  • Taking Charge of Your High Blood Pressure
    For many people, treating high blood pressure means taking charge of their diet and physical activity level. This eMedTV Web page lists a number of things you can do to reduce your blood pressure, as well as your risk of long-term health problems.
  • Tarka
    Tarka is a drug used to treat high blood pressure in adults -- but it is not a cure for high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment covers how Tarka works, how and when to take it, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Tarka and Pregnancy
    Problems with Tarka and pregnancy can potentially occur during any trimester. This eMedTV page covers complications seen with some fetuses or newborns exposed to Tarka during pregnancy, such as developmental problems with the lungs or loss of life.
  • Tarka and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page lists things you can do if you're taking Tarka and weight gain occurs, such as getting regular exercise and eating a heart-healthy diet. This page also explains how rapid weight gain can signify heart failure in some people on Tarka.
  • Tarka Cough
    This portion of the eMedTV archives describes how Tarka can cause a chronic, dry cough in some people. In previous clinical studies, up to 4.6 percent of people taking Tarka for high blood pressure reported a Tarka cough.
  • Tarka Dosage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, the recommended Tarka dosage for people with high blood pressure will vary from Tarka 2 mg/180 mg to Tarka 4 mg/240 mg once a day. This page also lists tips for taking your Tarka dose.
  • Tarka Drug Interactions
    Among the drugs that can potentially interfere with Tarka are diuretics, NSAIDs, and lithium. This portion of the eMedTV archives describes how drug interactions with Tarka can alter the levels of some drugs in the blood and contribute to kidney damage.
  • Tarka Medicine
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, if you have high blood pressure, the prescription medicine Tarka may be prescribed as a treatment. This article provides some basic drug information on Tarka and includes a link to more details.
  • Tarka Overdose
    While it is uncommon, a person can overdose on Tarka. This portion of the eMedTV archives describes some Tarka overdose symptoms (such as dizziness, an irregular heartbeat, and seizures) and treatment options (including fluids through an IV).
  • Tarka Precautions and Warnings
    Among the Tarka precautions and warnings discussed in this section of the eMedTV library are an increased risk of infections in some people taking Tarka and the safety of taking the drug if you're pregnant or have liver or kidney disease.
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